Patmos Planet: For the Word of God and For the Testimony of Jesus Christ.
Patmos Planet Homepage Messages Audio Files Patmos Videos
Miscellinkeous e-Communication Links Patmos Sitmap

Operation Eager Pursuit Dai Loc Pass 1/7's Area USS Valley Forge Miscellaneous

Dai Loc Pass

Previous   Next

The young man on the far right we called "Bootcamp," and he looked about 14 or 15 years old, but oh could he cuss. As a matter of fact, I thought I could cuss quite well (choir boy that I was) until he came around. Cussing, by the way, is just one of those Marine Corps attributes one gets by osmosis via the Drill Instructors

On the Ridge Above Dai Loc Pass

________________________

On the mule again: Once in the compound below I was asked to start a one up and move it while one of the flames guys talking to some big brass. Well, the mule was parked facing a small metal building, and I thought it was in neutral as I pulled the rope next to the seat that sat on the front edge. It wasn't, and it jumped into the building with a big thud as I jumped out of the way like a bull fighter. Ole!

Which One is the Mule?

Dai Loc Pass was just outside of Da Nang, and we were there two times at the top of the ridge. I think the first time was around April 1969, and then later in October/November until my group went home in December. All these photos were from the second time, and there are a few newer guys in this one. The young man on the far right we called "Bootcamp," and he looked about 14 or 15 years old, but oh could he cuss. As a matter of fact, I thought I could cuss quite well (choir boy that I was) until he came around. Cussing, by the way, is just one of those Marine Corps attributes one gets by osmosis via the Drill Instructors. One day, while my Platoon Commander was having a chat with me in front of the other recruits, I managed to use the F-word several times trying to impress him with my new Marine Corps verbiage. At some point he stopped me and asked if my mother knew I talked like that.

We were up on the top of the ridge in the photo which had a road that wound its way up from the compound below. The small flatbed vehicle we are sitting on was called a "mule" which was designed to carry a 106mm recoilless rifle, or just quick transportation. In training on the 106, we had to drive this thing up a steep hill after pulling the lawnmower cord to get it started. One guy flipped over backward with the instructor - no one hurt. I think it was the same instructor who had a real sadistic streak about him. As I recall, someone had messed up and he was hitting the guy with his helmet or some other object. (His last name was Killet of all things.) As if directed by an unseen force, all of us trainees advanced toward the instructor in defense of our comrade, and Killet became fearful of the embolden and encircling wave of green and backed off.

On the mule again: Once in the compound below I was asked to start one up and move it while one of the flames' guys was talking to some big brass. Well, the mule was parked facing a small metal building, and I thought it was in neutral as I pulled the rope next to the seat that sat on the front edge. It wasn't, and it jumped into the building with a big thud as I jumped out of the way like a bull fighter. Ole!

The first night we were in the compound we were asleep one early morning in a large wooden framed tent when a rocket screamed in and hit a hilltop above. Grabbing our flak jackets and rifles we sought a sandbagged ditch outside, but Buck was still on his cot sleeping away. A new kind of reveille to experience for those who heard it.

One time in the compound we got to throw a bunch of trash into a pit to burn, and like little kids we hurried to be the first to light the gasoline soaked pile. Vaboom! It went off while one Marine had his head over the stuff, and it dazed him for a while; but he looked a bit sophisticated and older with his hair and eyebrows singed white against his dark skin. (1/10/2011)

Previous   Next

 


The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you all.  Amen.